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Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Cave Spring, Georgia

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cave Spring, Georgia
City
Downtown Cave Spring
Downtown Cave Spring
Location in Floyd County and the state of Georgia
Location in Floyd County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 34°6′32″N 85°20′10″WCoordinates: 34°6′32″N 85°20′10″W
Country United States
State Georgia
County Floyd
Area
 • Total 4 sq mi (10.4 km2)
 • Land 4 sq mi (10.4 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 640 ft (195 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,200
 • Density 243.8/sq mi (93.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 30124
Area code(s) 706/762
FIPS code 13-14108[1]
GNIS feature ID 0355041[2]
Cave Spring is a city in Floyd County, Georgia, United States. It is located 12.24 miles (19.70 km) south of Rome, Georgia. The population was 975 at the 2000 census but has grown to around 1200 in 2010. It is part of the Rome, Georgia Metropolitan Statistical Area.
The town was named after the cave and water spring located in Rolater Park.[3] The cave has impressive stalagmites and the legendary "Devil's Stool" formation. The spring water has won awards for purity and taste. Many visitors bring jugs to fill at the spring and take home for drinking.

Contents

Geography

Cave Spring is located at 34°6′32″N 85°20′10″W (34.108912, -85.336018).[4] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.0 square miles (10 km2), of which, 4.0 square miles (10 km2) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.10 km2) of it (0.50%) is water.

History

Rolater Park is known for its spring water and pre-Civil War cave.
Cave Spring is well known for the natural wonders of the cave and spring site where native Indians came to the area (both Cherokee and earlier Mississippian culture). Legend has it that tribal meetings and games used to be held at the site. In 1839, Cave Spring was formed as a small town, founded by Baptists who were among the early settlers. The cave and spring site is now the part of Rolater Park ,formerly used by educational institutions such as Cave Spring Manual Labor School (renamed Hearn Academy) and others including Georgia School for the Deaf. During the Atlanta campaign of the American Civil War of 1864, both Confederate and Union troops came to Cave Spring for hospitalization and rest.
The spring flows into a sparkling pond from Rolater Park and then into a 1.5-acre (6,100 m2) swimming pool shaped like the state of Georgia. The pool is constructed out of stones.
Cave Spring has historic homes and buildings from its early years such as the 1867 Presbyterian Church, 1880 train depot, and 19th century hotels and boarding houses.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 835
1890 952
14.0%
1900 824
−13.4%
1910 805
−2.3%
1920 738
−8.3%
1930 723
−2.0%
1940 982
35.8%
1950 959
−2.3%
1960 1,153
20.2%
1970 1,305
13.2%
1980 883
−32.3%
1990 950
7.6%
2000 975
2.6%
2010 1,200
23.1%
Est. 2014 1,167 [5] −2.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 975 people, 404 households, and 281 families residing in the city. The population density was 242.7 people per square mile (93.6/km²). There were 431 housing units at an average density of 107.3 per square mile (41.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 84.82% White, 12.41% African American, 0.62% Native American, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 1.44% from other races, and 0.62% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.15% of the population.
There were 404 households out of which 28.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 14.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 29.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.89.
In the city the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 23.8% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 22.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 83.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 75.5 males.
The building of the Georgia School for the Deaf, Fannin Hall, was built in 1846. It was later used as a field hospital for Civil War soldiers.
The median income for a household in the city was $33,750, and the median income for a family was $47,917. Males had a median income of $35,395 versus $20,962 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,850. About 14.0% of families and 15.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.6% of those under age 18 and 13.9% of those age 65 or over.

Georgia School for the Deaf

Cave Spring is the home of Georgia School for the Deaf, established in 1846. It is a state-funded residential school operating under the auspices of the Office of Special Services of the Georgia State Department of Education and the Georgia State Board of Education. It aims to ensure that appropriate educational programs are available for hearing impaired and multi-handicapped hearing impaired students residing in Georgia. GSD was once a field hospital for both Confederate and Union troops during the Civil War.

Friday, August 7, 2015

Peking University, the alter name for Beijing University

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Coordinates: 39°59′23″N 116°18′19″E
Peking University
北京大学
Peking University seal.svg
Former names
Imperial University of Peking[1]
Established 1898
Type Public
President Lin Jianhua (林建华)
Party Secretary Zhu Shanlu
Academic staff
4,206[2]
Undergraduates 15,128[2]
Postgraduates 15,119[2]
Location Haidian District, Beijing, China
Campus Urban, 273 ha (670 acres)
Affiliations IARU, AEARU, APRU, BESETOHA, C9
Website www.pku.edu.cn
Peking University
Simplified Chinese 北京大学
Traditional Chinese 北京大學

Peking University's West Gate, one of the symbols of the university campus
Peking University (abbreviated PKU and colloquially known by the Chinese as Běidà 北大; Chinese: 北京大学, pinyin: Běijīng Dàxué), is a major Chinese research university located in Beijing and a member of the C9 League. It is the first modern national university established in China, founded as the "Imperial University of Peking" in 1898 as a replacement of the ancient Taixue or Guozijian, or Imperial Academy.[3] It also served as the highest administration for education in China at the beginning of its founding.[4] By 1920, it had become a center for progressive thought. Alongside Tsinghua University, Peking University has consistently ranked as the top higher learning institution in mainland China.[5][6][7][8][9] In addition to academics, Peking University is especially renowned for its campus grounds,[10][11][12] and the beauty of its traditional Chinese architecture.[13]
Throughout its history, the university has educated and hosted many prominent modern Chinese thinkers, including figures such as: Lu Xun, Mao Zedong, Gu Hongming, Hu Shih, Li Dazhao, and Chen Duxiu.[14] Peking University was influential in the birth of China's New Culture Movement, May Fourth Movement, the Tiananmen Square protest of 1989 and many other significant events.[15]

Contents

History


Satellite image of Peking University. (1967-09-20)
When it was established on July 3, 1898, the school was known as the Imperial University of Peking (simplified Chinese: 京师大学堂; traditional Chinese: 京師大學堂; pinyin: Jīngshī Dàxuétáng). It was established to replace Taixue or Guozijian, or Imperial Academy, as part of the Hundred Days' Reform. In 1912, following the Xinhai Revolution, the Imperial University was renamed "National Peking University" (simplified Chinese: 国立北京大学; traditional Chinese: 國立北京大學; pinyin: Guólì Běijīng Dàxué). The noted scholar Cai Yuanpei was appointed president on January 4, 1917, and helped transform the university into the country's largest institution of higher learning, with 14 departments and an enrollment of more than 2,000 students. Cai, inspired by the German model of academic freedom, recruited an intellectually diverse faculty that included Hu Shih, Chen Duxiu, and Lu Xun. In 1919, students of Peking University formed the bulk of the protesters of the May Fourth Movement. Efforts by the Beiyang government to end the protests by sealing off the Peking University campus led to Cai's resignation. In 1920, Peking University became the first Chinese university to accept female students.

View of the central campus
After the outbreak of the Second Sino-Japanese War in 1937 (and the resulting expansion of Japanese territorial control in east China), Peking University moved to Changsha and formed the Changsha Temporary University along with Tsinghua University and Nankai University. In 1938, the three schools moved again, this time to Kunming, and formed the National Southwestern Associated University. In 1946, after World War II, Peking University moved back to Beijing. At that time, the university comprised six schools (Arts, Science, Law, Medicine, Engineering, and Agriculture), and a research institute for humanities. The total student enrollment grew up to 3,000.
In 1949, after the People's Republic of China was established, Peking University lost its "national" appellation to reflect the fact that all universities under the new socialist state would be public. In 1952, the Chinese government re-grouped the country's higher education institutions with individual institutions tending to specialize in a certain field of study. As a result, arts and science faculties of Tsinghua University and Yenching University were merged into Peking University. At the same time, however, the university lost its Law, Medicine, Engineering and Agriculture schools. These schools and faculties were either merged into other universities or to found new colleges. During the re-grouping, Yenching University was closed and Peking University moved from downtown Beijing to the former Yenching campus.
The first disturbances of the Cultural Revolution began at Peking University in 1966; education there ceased between 1966 and 1970.
In 2000, Beijing Medical University was merged into Peking University and became the Peking University Health Science Campus. Peking University now has eight affiliated hospitals and 12 teaching hospitals.
In 2001, Peking University established the Yuanpei Program which was formalized in 2007 as Yuanpei College, named in honor of a highly respected former university president Cai Yuanpei. The college hosts an elite undergraduate liberal program for select students.
In 2001, Peking University set up a satellite campus in Shenzhen. The university's second business school was launched on this campus in 2004.
In 2014, Peking University announced Yenching Scholars, a new global graduate leaders program, which will be launched in 2015 and will be located in the recently completed residential Yenching Academy in the center of campus. The program will offer 100 elite students full scholarships for one-year of interdisciplinary studies leading to a master's degree.
In 2014, Peking University joined the Asian Future Leaders Scholarship program, which will begin in 2015. The program will offer 100 students from East Asia a full scholarship for a MBA or MPA at a few leading universities in Asia, including Peking University.

Academics

University rankings
Global
ARWU[16] 101-150
Times[17] 48
QS[18] 57
Asia
ARWU[19] 6-15
Times[20] 4
QS (Global version)[21]
QS (Asia version)[22]
12
7

The Weiming Lake, located in the north center of the university campus

One of the administrative buildings with the huabiao

Peking University during spring

A stone bridge inside the campus
Peking University is a national key university.[23] The university consists of 30 colleges and 12 departments, with 93 specialties for undergraduates, 2 specialties for the second Bachelor's degree, 199 specialties for Master's degree candidates and 173 specialties for doctoral candidates. A leader in basic sciences research and teaching, the university has successfully developed applied sciences research and teaching as well.
At present, Peking university has 216 research institutions and research centres, including 2 national engineering research centers, 81 key national disciplines, 12 national key laboratories. With 4.5 million holdings, the university library is the largest of its kind in Asia.[24]
The university has made an effort to combine the research on fundamental scientific issues with the training of personnel with high level specialized knowledge and professional skill as demanded by the country's modernization. Peking University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Emory University jointly administer the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering Program, which is ranked the 2nd in the United States [25][26]
Peking University has been becoming a center for teaching and research, consisting of diverse branches of learning such as pure & applied sciences, social sciences & humanities, and sciences of management & education.
Over the past century, more than 400 Peking University alumni had become presidents of other major Chinese universities, including former Tsinghua President Luo Jialun, Renmin University President Yuan Baohua, Zhejiang University President Qian Sanqiang, Fudan University President Zhang Zhirang, Nankai University President Teng Weizao, Chinese University of Science and Technology President Guan Weiyan and many others.[27]
Many domestic rankings have placed Peking University among the top universities in mainland China, alongside Tsinghua University.[5] In 2015, the Chinese University Alumni Association in partnership with China Education Center considered it 1st among national universities.[5]
U.S. News & World Report ranked Peking University 39th in the world which is the best within Greater China.[28] It also topped the newly launched Times Higher Education BRICS & Emerging Economies.[29]

Campus, art and culture

The Burger King

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For the restaurant chain, see Burger King.
The Burger King
Creepy King Bed.png
The Burger King as seen in Burger King's Wake Up with the King commercial
Agency Crispin Porter + Bogusky
Client Burger King
Title Wake Up with the King
Product
  • Whopper
  • Product tie-in
  • Enormous Omelet Sandwich
Release date(s) 2003-2011, 2015-[1]
The Burger King is a character created as the advertising mascot for international fast food restaurant chain Burger King that has been used in numerous television commercials and advertising programs. The character has undergone several iterations over the course of its company's history. The first iteration of the King was part of a sign at the first Burger King restaurant in Miami, Florida in 1955. Later signs showed the King sitting on a "burger throne" as well as atop the BK sign while holding a beverage. In the early 1970s Burger King started using a small, animated version of the King called "Kurger Bing"[2] in its children's advertising where the animated Burger King was voiced by Allen Swift. By the late 70s, the original animated King was replaced by the "Marvelous Magical Burger King". This is a red-bearded, Tudor-era king who ruled the Burger King Kingdom and performed magic tricks that were mostly sleight-of-hand, but sometimes relied on camera tricks or involved his "Magic Ring" which could summon copious amounts of food. The children's ads featuring the King were phased out by the late 1980s in favor of the BK Kids Club Gang and other subsequent programs.
When advertising agency Crispin Porter + Bogusky took over the advertising account of Burger King in 2003, they devised a caricatured variation of the Burger King character from the Burger King Kingdom advertising campaign, now simply called "the King". During the use of CP+B's new version of the King, ads generated significant word of mouth for its new use of what various trade publications and Internet articles labeled "the Creepy King" persona, an appellation that BK came to favor and CP+B used in its ads. However, the use of the King failed to provide a consistent message regarding the company and its products.
Upon the takeover of Burger King by 3G Capital in 2010, the company terminated its relationship with CP+B. In August 2011, Burger King announced that the character would be retired as the primary mascot for the brand.
However, the company resumed using the King beginning in May 2015 with a paid appearance as a member of Floyd Mayweather, Jr.'s entourage before the Mayweather vs. Pacquiao fight. The next was an appearance in the grandstands at the 2015 Belmont Stakes, with the character standing behind Bob Baffert, the horse trainer of American Pharoah.

Contents

History

1960s-1980s

In the late 1960s to early 1970s Burger King started using a small, animated version of the King in its children's advertising where the animated Burger King was voiced by Allen Swift. The Burger King was featured in a series of advertisements in which he would visit a Burger King outlet for an interview with a television reporter or see a former court wizard who now worked for the chain. In all ads the King would present children with small gifts or buy them some Burger King food. Many of these commercials featured the king character reciting the restaurant's slogan, "Burger King, where kids are king".
By the late 70s, the original animated King was replaced by the "Marvelous Magical Burger King", a red-bearded, Tudor-era king who ruled the Burger King Kingdom and performed magic tricks that were mostly sleight-of-hand, but sometimes relied on camera tricks or involved his "Magic Ring" which could summon copious amounts of food. The King was accompanied by usually two or more children and notable characters such as "Sir Shake-a-Lot" (a knight that has a craving for milkshakes), the "Burger Thing" (a W.C. Fields-esque hamburger portrait), and "The Duke of Doubt" who often doubted the King's abilities, and the robotic "Wizard of Fries". This campaign paralleled McDonald's McDonaldland children's commercials, which featured "Ronald McDonald", "The Hamburglar", and "Mayor McCheese", along with other characters and mascots.
The children's ads featuring the King were phased out by the late 1980s in favor of the BK Kids Club Gang ads.
rimary Role
CEO and Co-Founder @ Fitbit
Education
Harvard University
Gender:
Male
Location:
Unknown
Website:
http://www.fitbit.com/company
- See more at: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/james-park#sthash.XFdsqnFT.dp
James Park is presenting at TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2015 on Sep 21, 2015  
Update
Primary Role
CEO and Co-Founder @ Fitbit
Education
Harvard University
Gender:
Male
Location:
Unknown
Website:
http://www.fitbit.com/company

Person Details

Update
James Park is a serial entrepreneur with a passion for creating great products and companies. Fitbit is the third startup that he has founded.
Previously, James was a Director of Product Development at CNET Networks, where he led product management, engineering, and design for Webshots.
Before CNET, James was a co-founder of Windup Labs, which was acquired by CNET in 2005, and prior to Windup Labs, he was the co-founder and CTO of Epesi Technologies.
James also worked at Morgan Stanley, where he helped develop trading strategies and software for a quantitative trading fund.
James never quite finished his computer science degree at Harvard College.

Jobs (5)

Update
Current

CEO and Co-Founder

Fitbit
May, 2007 - Current   (over 8 years)
Past
Started
Ended
Title
Company
Apr, 2005
May, 2007
Director of Product Development
2002
Apr, 2005
President and Co-Founder
Oct, 1999
Nov, 2001
co-founder and CTO
Jun, 1998
Aug, 1999
Analyst
- See more at: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/james-park#sthash.XFdsqnFT.dpuf
James Park is presenting at TechCrunch Disrupt SF 2015 on Sep 21, 2015  
Update
Primary Role
CEO and Co-Founder @ Fitbit
Education
Harvard University
Gender:
Male
Location:
Unknown
Website:
http://www.fitbit.com/company

Person Details

Update
James Park is a serial entrepreneur with a passion for creating great products and companies. Fitbit is the third startup that he has founded.
Previously, James was a Director of Product Development at CNET Networks, where he led product management, engineering, and design for Webshots.
Before CNET, James was a co-founder of Windup Labs, which was acquired by CNET in 2005, and prior to Windup Labs, he was the co-founder and CTO of Epesi Technologies.
James also worked at Morgan Stanley, where he helped develop trading strategies and software for a quantitative trading fund.
James never quite finished his computer science degree at Harvard College.

Jobs (5)

Update
Current

CEO and Co-Founder

Fitbit
May, 2007 - Current   (over 8 years)
Past
Started
Ended
Title
Company
Apr, 2005
May, 2007
Director of Product Development
2002
Apr, 2005
President and Co-Founder
Oct, 1999
Nov, 2001
co-founder and CTO
Jun, 1998
Aug, 1999
Analyst
- See more at: https://www.crunchbase.com/person/james-park#sthash.XFdsqnFT.dpuf